Dinah Miller – The Personality Girl




Written by Terry Brown

Dinah Miller, was a superb ‘rhythm’ and swing singer whose career has been completely overlooked compared to many of her contemporaries. She was a highly successful band singer and radio performer in the UK in the latter part of the thirties and later on she became a big star in Sweden well into the 1960’s.

This is the first time her extraordinary story has been fully explored anywhere.

Dinah, sometimes described in the parlance of the day, as ‘coloured’, or ‘dusky’, or some other inappropriate term, was indeed of mixed race. She was born to a black mother, (of Caribbean origin) and Welsh born father on 4 November 1916, in West Ham, London. Her real name was, Winifred (after her mother), Caroline Briggs. Her mother encouraged her in all her musical inclinations, and at the age of three and a half she attended the Maude Wells Academy of Dancing, based in East London. When she was seven, Diana won the All England Championship Medal for tap-dancing, which she repeated, aged nine and again at twelve. At the same age, she began school proper, but after a year or so, she dropped out, determined to make a name for herself, in show business.

Dinah spelt out her journey into the world of entertainment, in a later interview she gave to Radio Pictorial. As a, ‘crazy to go on the stage’, fifteen year old in 1931, she had already performed in pubs, a concert party and pantomime, ‘at seven and sixpence a week, living in!’, before entering a talent contest at the Granada Cinema, Walthamstow, in London, where she won a first prize of £15.00, for her rendition of Dinah, which became her theme song and from which she adopted the stage name of Dinah Miller. She entered a similar contest in Tooting shortly afterwards, but on that occasion was beaten to second place by a singing act, The Four Aces. Dinah continued, ‘Following this came an engagement in a coloured review, which lasted just three weeks. Then came my first offer to sing in a night club. I accepted.’ Dinah went on to detail the hard work involved, ‘working from 11.00pm to 4.00am’, and although to begin with was, ‘very raw, very nervous’, after six months, she, ‘really learned how a dance-band vocalist should sing’.

She continued doing club work with occasional variety bookings, for much of 1933/4, with a six month spell at Murray’s Club in Beak Street, as compere/vocalist during 1935. On the 5th November 1935, (with a repeat on 6th), Dinah made her BBC radio debut in, The Little Show – Harlem Half Hour – with the Cole Brothers, the Marino Norris Trio, and other up and coming black artists. For the balance of the year Dinah was performing on the H & G Kinema, cine-variety circuit, including London’s Troxy cinema in East London.

As 1935 became 1936, things really began to warm up for Dinah, as the Parlophone Record Company had heard her sing, and offered Dinah a one year contract. So, on 24 January 1936, Dinah made her first solo recording, (F407), with a handpicked backing group from Roy Fox’s band, consisting of, Phil Oliver (cl. sax.), Jack Nathan, (piano), Ivor Mairants, (guitar), George Gibbs, (bass), and Maurice Burman on drums. Of the two sides, Porgy, was highly rated, although Dinah’s tap dancing on the second side, Rhythm is my Nursery Rhymes, didn’t go down so well, at least for the reviewer in Rhythm magazine. Meanwhile another opportunity appeared in the shape of Oscar Rabin’s Romany Band, (then resident at Hammersmith Palais). Rabin had arranged a two month variety tour for his band, joint led and fronted by guitarist/singer, Harry Davis. Davis intended to showcase the tap dancing of his teenage daughter Beryl, who at the time was another All England tap-dancing Champion. Dinah was recruited to coach and mentor young Beryl, as well as appear and organise some of the staging. Beryl Davis became better known for her singing with the band as time went on.

Dinah recorded a single title with Rabin’s Romany Band on 19 February 1936, Woe is Me ( Columbia FB1339). During her tour with Rabin, which ended in June 1936, recorded with Harry Roy, with two sides made on 25 February,, in which they duetted and she tap danced, (Swing/Eeny Meeny Miney Mo, ( Parlophone F409), and again, on 23rd March, she tap danced to Harry’s vocal on, Let Yourself Go, ( Parlophone F432). Dinah was now becoming a sought after singer and she accepted a contract from Sydney Kyte to become his regular female vocalist joining his band also in June 1936. She began broadcasting with him, almost immediately. Being featured singer with Sydney Kyte was a distinct step up the show biz ladder. Kyte was a highly respected band leader who had been a purveyor of high class dance music for the well-healed patrons of the Piccadilly Hotel, near Piccadilly Circus, from 1931.

On the 22 June 1936, Sidney Kyte left the Piccadilly Hotel, to undertake a variety tour around the Moss Empire circuit with a number of, ‘one nighters’, thrown in. He retained Dinah and his usual male live and broadcasting vocalist, Jack Plant to be his vocal team. Dinah was showcased in such numbers as, That’s What Harlem Means to Me, and I’m in the Mood for Love, and given ample opportunity to display her tap dancing skills. Apart from some trips to London for broadcasts, Dinah and the band stayed on the road, for almost eight months. Playing either for full or split weeks, sequentially 1936 took in appearances at such as, the Empire, Leeds, the Broadway Theatre, Dundee, the Tivoli and His Majesty’s Theatre, Aberdeen, the Palace Theatre, Reading, the Empire, Newcastle, the Brighton Hippodrome and in December, the Finsbury Park Empire, in London. Dinah also made her film debut, at this time, in a British International Picture, ‘The Tenth Man’, a drama starring John Lodge, in which she sings, Night Must Fall, (This can be seen on Youtube). I should also mention that over the course of 1936, Dinah had issued six more solo sides under her Parlophone contract, I’m Shooting High/Good-For-Nothin’ Joe, (F450), I’m a Fool for Loving You/Lost my Rhythm, Lost My Music, (F496), and River Man/I’m Pixilated Over You, (F532).

Again some critics took exception to Dinah’s inclusion of her tap dancing on some of these sides. Meanwhile, in January 1937, Dinah resumed her tour with Sydney Kyte, starting at the Empire Nottingham, followed by, the Empire, Sunderland, the Palace, Hull, the Plaza Coronation Cinema, Chorley, and the Spa Royal Hotel, Bridlington, (amongst others), with a number of one night stands in between, to April 1937. Following Sydney Kyte’s variety tour, Dinah remained as his principal female vocalist and went with him into the Carlton Hotel in London in April 1937, which had just resumed dancing. Dinah was also given her first chance on commercial radio, when she started a new weekly series for Radio Normandy, ‘Limelight on Rhythm’, for sponsor Idris Lime Juice. Starting, Sunday 18th April 1937, Dinah, billed as, ‘The Personality Girl’, was backed by, ‘John Collins Rhythm Six’, who some researchers believe to be a contingent of Harry Roy’s Band. Over the summer break from the Carlton, Dinah went with Kyte to appear at the De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill and on the South Parade Pier in Southsea. After the summer season, Dinah decided to go solo as a variety turn with a pianist, and left Sydney Kyte, although she still broadcast with him on occasions, over the balance of the year. Her stay with him had certainly added to her profile, although the fact that Kyte’s Decca record contract had ended just as she joined his band meant she did not have the opportunity to record with him. However she had of course graced scores of his broadcasts from both the Piccadilly and Carlton Hotels, which certainly added to her reputation and status as a swing/rhythm vocalist.

One of the first things Dinah did after leaving Kyte, was to make a guest appearance in the musical, ‘Saturday Night Review’, being made in July 1937. Although her name, (albeit), misspelled as, ‘Dinah Millar’, appears on a board introducing Sydney Kyte’s Band, alongside that of Canadian vocalist Gerry Fitzgerald. Unfortunately, in current prints of the film, we only get to see Fitzgerald singing with Kyte, with Dinah’s contribution missing. After completing her scenes, Dinah did more commercial broadcasting on Radio Normandy in August, replacing, Paula Green for a number of editions of, ‘Variety’, sponsored by Huntley & Palmer Biscuits. At this time Dinah also decided to have a bit of a make-over. Over the early years of her career, she had transformed from the gawky, 19 year old club singer/hoofer, to a more sophisticated ‘swing’ cum jazz vocalist. To this end, Dinah had straightened her hair, changed her make-up and generally glammed up. At this time she took her transformation one step further by having her hair dyed, ‘strawberry blond’, something she became associated with. With her completely new look she hit the road in cine-variety, at the South London Palladium in August 1937. Over the following months she was seen at, the Southall Dominion, Kensal Rise Palace, and elsewhere. After several more such appearances, she moved on to a featured cabaret spot with Harry Roy’s Lyricals, led by Maurice Kaskett at the Royal Bath Hotel, Bournemouth, from where she broadcast during September. In October, Dinah received one of those offers you don’t say no to – the opportunity to join US band leader, Jack Harris’s Band, again as featured singer, at Ciro’s Club, (which Harris owned), back in London. She didn’t need to be asked twice.

Harris, who had arrived in the UK in 1927, was considered one of the top London dance bands, and he’d bought Ciro’s Club, originally as a joint enterprise with Ambrose. By the time Dinah joined Harris, Ambrose had sold his interest to Harris and it was rated as one of the capital’s top night spots. Dinah, made her first BBC broadcast with Harris on 6 November 1937, with scores more to follow. Things were also looking good on the commercial radio front, when Dinah was asked to join fellow vocalist, Pat Hyde, to form, ‘The Milton Sisters’, a vocal team to front, ‘The Milton Sisters’, show, sponsored by Milton’s, ( a proprietary medicine). Initially on both Radio Luxembourg and Normandy, the first weekly show was broadcast on 22nd November 1937, with compere, Bob Danvers Walker and Arthur Young on piano. Introduced as, ‘Two girls with a sense of humour and a new way of singing new songs’, by Danvers Walker, Dinah and Pat Hyde were interviewed by Radio Pictorial at the time, and apart from outlining their careers to date also revealed that they had known each other as children, with Dinah born in West Ham and Pat in East Ham, London.

But back to our story.

As 1938 loomed, Dinah’s career continued apace, with her BBC and commercial broadcasts, her contract at Ciro’s with Jack Harris, occasional variety and club work and at last, another opportunity to record. Dinah recorded with Harris, on 29 November 1937, You Can’t Stop me From Dreaming ( HMV BD5302), and Say, Si, Si, ( HMV BD5305), with more to follow. Over the early part of 1938, Dinah was broadcasting weekly and appearing nightly at Ciro’s with Jack Harris, and on 20th January guested with Jack Hylton’s Band on BBC television. To March she also sang with Teddy Joyce & his Band of Beauties on four editions of his BBC radio series, ‘The Girl Friends’, and also found time to star in cabaret with Arthur Roseberry’s Octet at the Paradise Club in Regent Street. Dinah was praised in the May 1938 edition of Rhythm magazine. Voice teacher, Phyllis Frost, who was reviewing the top singers of the day put her as, ‘the best of the English ladies’, in terms of her singing, and noted, ‘she sings so smoothly, ‘her breath control was exceptional’, and, ‘it is my conclusion that Dinah, is the best we have’.

As to broadcasting, one particularly memorable BBC show Dinah appeared in, was the ‘Crooners Bee’ song contest, broadcast on 10 June 1938, and organised by Eddie Pola and Felix Mendelssohn. Along with Dinah, it featured vocalists, Helen Raymond, Marjorie Stedeford, Pat Hyde, Bettie Bucknelle, and Paula Green, pitched, (in a kind of singing contest), against Al Bowlly, Hugh French, Sam Costa, Robert Ashley, Jack Plant and Jack Lorimer, all backed by Mendelssohn’s band. Al Bowlly and Dinah Miller were deemed the winners. Decca issued two, ‘Singers on Parade’, recordings, (recorded on 7th October), which enshrined some of the performances, with Dinah singing, It’s D’Lovely, (Decca F6832). (Dinah was appearing at the Metropolitan Music Hall, at the time).

Over the course of 1938 Dinah made more than 50 broadcasts with Jack Harris, (excluding a series of 26 BBC short wave broadcasts to the US, made after hours at Ciro’s at 2.00am each day), 20 editions of, ‘The Milton Sisters’, to May, (on commercial radio), three more BBC television appearances, (‘Contrast’ on 9th March and two editions of ‘Sweet Jam’, on 4th August and 2nd November, respectively), and had issued 6 more sides, for HMV, with Jack Harris’s Band. She had also broadcast with Joe Kaye & his Band from the Ritz Hotel, and appeared in editions of, ‘Monday Night at Seven’, amongst other BBC radio work during the year. As 1938 came to an end, Dinah took a break from performing and holidayed around Europe, where at a stay in Sweden, she managed to get a small part, (as a dancer), in the Swedish film, ‘En Enda Natt’, (One Single Night). At the start of 1939, Melody Maker reported that Dinah, was about to leave Jack Harris after 15 months to freelance, and she made her last broadcast with him on 14 January 1939. I mentioned earlier Dinah’s, ‘makeover’ and at this time, Dinah took things even further by declaring that from then on, she was to be called Diana, rather than Dinah Miller. In fact as early as May 1938, Dinah had on occasions in the music press had her name given as, Diana, but certainly from the start of 1939, billing material and music press articles, all name her as Diana Miller. Diana, (as I’ll call her now), announced her re-invention, by appearing on the front cover of Radio Pictorial for 20 January 1939, with her striking hair, (in colour), and her new name.

Over the following few months, Diana worked and broadcast with Benny Loban’s Rhythm Weavers, at the Royal Bath Hotel in Bournemouth and later from March to May 1939, with Reginald Williams & his Futurist’s, both bands broadcasting on the BBC’s West Country Service. Diana also made her final UK recording with Reginald Williams, Talk to Me (‘Cause I Know What to Do), recorded on 5 March 1939, ( Columbia FB2227). Making note of Diana’s broadcasts with Williams, The Stage mentioned that Diana had made successes of a number of new songs, including, They Say, I’ve Got a Heartful of Music and You Go To My Head. In July, (just after Diana appeared with Teddy Joyce’s Band at the London South East Trocadero), she told Radio Pictorial that she was about to go to Denmark, where she had been offered very well paid cabaret and club work, as well as two weeks at the National Scala in Copenhagen.

Now, with the benefit of hindsight, undertaking such a journey might be considered foolhardy to say the least, with WW2 about to break out. But at the time the threat of war had retreated somewhat with the assumption that Hitler’s conquests to date were as far as he would go, (particularly after the, ‘Peace in our Time’, deal announced by Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain, the previous September). Anyway, no doubt 23 year old Diana saw it as an exciting and whole new opportunity and with no reason to be particularly concerned about such a trip, in July 1939, she set off, (with her pianist, Frank Still), for Denmark. She appeared at the Scala and several clubs in Copenhagen, before moving onto the, ‘Regnbuen’, (Rainbow) Restaurant in Oslo in Norway, where she had signed a one year contract to perform.

The restaurant’s orchestra, led by Yngvar Wang, featured tenor saxophonist, Harald Barwin, and was well rated in swing circles, and Diana fitted in very comfortably, both singing with the band and in cabaret with her pianist. Diana was even heard on short wave radio broadcasting on the Danish service, Radio Kalundberg on 20 January 1940. Things were going well, with Diana becoming very popular and established, when unexpectedly the war caught up with the Netherlands. On 9 April 1940, the Germans launched their invasion of Denmark and Norway and Oslo was an early intended target. Diana had to make a quick getaway and with the help of friends managed to make her way to neutral, Sweden. Unfortunately, her pianist, Frank Still was less lucky and was captured. He was interned in Germany for the duration.

Diana, with no-where to go, became effectively trapped in Sweden. But fortunately her reputation had preceded her to some extent and she quickly began to find her bearings in the confines of Sweden’s entertainment world. Within a month she was recording with Nisse Linds Hot Trio and broadcasting. Detailed research as to exactly what Diana did or didn’t do during this period is extremely difficult to come by, with a great deal of archive material destroyed during the war. I can only provide a summary until more detailed research is undertaken in Sweden. First a word or two about Diana’s recording work in Sweden, which proved substantial. Between May 1940 and October 1944, she issued some 50 sides for the Sonora, HMV and Columbia labels, with a range of groups and bands, all of which proved very popular. Diana, usually sang in English, although on occasions it was a mixture of English and Swedish, which she described herself as, ‘Svenglish’.

Diana remained primarily based in Stockholm, working in hotels and clubs, although she was regularly featured in the reviews devised by Gosta Bernard at the Casino Theatre. She also took the opportunity to tour in Sweden with the bands of, Emil Iwring, Jay Elwing, Seymour Sterwall, and others. I should also mention Diana’s appearance as a club singer in the Swedish film, ‘Lärarinna på vift’, (Roman Holiday), released in 1941. Diana sang, Bobinga, which she also recorded, and more importantly it was here that Diana first met, Ketty Selmer, (born Marie Jorgensen, to an unmarried mother), who was playing a bit role in the movie. Diana and Ketty would eventually become lifelong partners, but following the filming, Ketty had to return to her mother in Denmark where she too became trapped. The two only met up again in 1944.

There are many stories about what Ketty got up to under the German occupation of Denmark, and research for the film, ‘Flame and Citron’, (Denmark 2009), which depicts the occupation, (and includes a character supposedly based on Ketty), did uncover, she had close ties with several high ranking Gestapo officers, but also spied for the Russians and gave intelligence to the Danish Resistance. Her life was also complicated by the fact she had got married in 1943, although this was done for the sake of image rather than anything else, with both she and her husband having sexual proclivities, generally elsewhere. Whatever Ketty got up to, it made her a fairly wealthy woman. According to one source she was paid 20,000 Danish Kroner by the Gestapo in November 1944 for services rendered.

As the Nazi’s were beaten back, Diana and Ketty finally got back together and renewed their relationship, with both initially settling in Copenhagen, Denmark. By the late 1940’s they had moved to Stockholm where they had built a farmhouse just outside the city. Again, I can only generalise here but at this time, Diana was still making a successful living as a singer and Ketty had taken up journalism and photography. Apart from club work and the variety stage, Diana also toured again, broadcast and opened a dance academy.

Although a star in Sweden, Diana had completely disappeared from the UK music press over the war years, to the extent that a different, Diana Miller, (an impressionist), could pursue her career without any confusion arising. Diana did eventually return to London in late 1948, to look at the possibility of re-launching herself in the UK, whilst Ketty went to Spain for a holiday. Diana did get work, and was showcased on BBC radio in such series as, ‘Evening in Cuba’, and, ‘Tropical Island Magic’, both with Stanley Black’s Orchestra. She even became a columnist for a London based Swedish magazine, but she didn’t like the kind of work she was being offered and realised where her career lay and it wasn’t in the UK. So in March 1949, she left the UK for good and returned to Sweden. One of the first things Diana did was record two sides for the Cupol label with, Thore Ehrlings Orchestra, The Marharaja of Magador/ Os Quindins de Yaya, (4216).

As the 40’s became the 50’s, Diana was an established part of Sweden’s music scene and in 1952, she formed a trio, with guitarist, Hetty Vleeming and bass player, Siw Karlen, (with Diana on accordion and vocals). Later, Diana expanded the trio into a band, with the addition of, Gullie Forslund, (vibraphone), Inger Lindberg (piano), and others from time to time. The American Billboard magazine reported Diana’s presence at a special jazz concert held in Stockholm’s K. B. Hall on 15 November 1952, in which she appeared with Lil Armstrong and also noted in February 1953, the successful two month sojourn of Diana’s band at Copenhagen’s Scala Salon Ballroom.

This level of popularity continued and for the next fifteen years or so, Diana with her trio/band toured very successfully throughout the whole of Europe, as well as undertaking seasons on transatlantic cruise liners. Notably amongst all of Diana’s activities over that period were the trio’s seasons at, ‘The Blue Note’ jazz club in Paris, alternating with the Bud Powell Trio, seasons in Amsterdam and The Hague and the opening of the trio’s own club, the ‘Scheherazade’, in Scheveningen, in Holland. Although a regular broadcaster over this period, Diana made only one more record and that had to wait until 1965. By that time, apart from her music activities, Diana, (with Ketty’s assistance), had built up a highly successful catering business and had interests in restaurants both in Stockholm and Sodertalje. Aside this, Diana had also decided to open her own jazz club in Stockholm, ‘The Blue Note’, based on the famous Parisian jazz club. Diana threw caution to the wind with this club, as although homosexuality was still illegal at the time, she actively encouraged her lesbian friends to treat it as their own. It proved a huge attraction and in 1969, Diana opened her second club, Jerry’s Club, again in Stockholm and again pitched it at a lesbian clientele.

Although Diana still made occasional appearances usually with her trio, the catering operation had taken over her life and by the early 1970’s, it fully occupied her time. Around 1976, Diana and Ketty decided to retire to Majorca, where Diana had bought a villa, and this is where the two decided to spend the rest of their lives. Sadly, Ketty died in 1979. Diana herself died on 1 March 1993. Her demise went unreported, her career completely forgotten. But from the preceding, I think you’ll agree she led one hell of a life.

Dinah/Diana Miller Discography

London 24 January 1936
??? – Porgy (DuBose Heyward/Gershwin) – Dinah Miller vocal, with instrumental accomp. – Parlophone F407
??? – Rhythm in my Nursery Rhymes (Cahn/Raye/Lunceford/Chaplin) – Dinah Miller vocal & tap dancing, with Instrumental accomp. – Parlophone F407
??? – I’m Shooting High (Koehler/McHugh) – Dinah Miller vocal & tap dancing, with instrumental accomp. – Parlophone F450
??? – Good for Nothin’ Joe (DuBose Heyward/Gershwin) – Dinah Miller vocal, with instrumental accomp. – Parlophone F450

London 19 February 1936
CA15634-2 – Woe is Me (Cavanagh/Sandford/Emmerich) – The Romany Band directed by Oscar Rabin v. Dinah Miller – Columbia FB1339

London 25 February 1936
CE7467-1 – Swing (Vivien Ellis) – Harry Roy & his Orchestra – v. Dinah Miller & Harry Roy – Parlophone F409
CE7468-1 – Eeny, Meeny, Miney, Mo (Mercer/Malneck) – Harry Roy & his Orchestra – v. Dinah Miller & Harry Roy – Parlophone F409

London 23 March 1936
CE7541-1 – Let Yourself Go (Irving Berlin) – Harry Roy & his Orchestra – v. Harry Roy – tap dancing – Dinah Miller – Parlophone F432

London c. June 1936
??? – I’m a Fool for Loving You (Lewis/Wendling) – Dinah Miller vocal, with instrumental accomp. – Parlophone F496
??? – Lost My Rhythm, Lost My Man (Brown/Maxwell/Akst) – Dinah Miller vocal & tap dancing, with instrumental accomp. – Parlophone F496

London c. September 1936
??? – River Man (Cavanaugh/Simon/Mysels) – Dinah Miller vocal, with instrumental accomp. – Parlophone F532
??? – I’m Pixilated over You (Heyman/Spina) – Dinah Miller vocal, with instrumental accomp. – Parlophone F532

London 29 November 1937
OEA5141-1 – You Can’t Stop me from Dreaming (Franklin/Friend) – Jack Harris & his Orchestra v. Dinah Miller & chorus – HMV BD5302
OEA5142-1 – Say Si Si (Stillman/Lubin/Lecuona) – Jack Harris & his Orchestra v. Pat Taylor/Dinah Miller/Elsie Carlisle – HMV BD5305

London 5 March 1938
OEA6415-1 – The Gypsy in my Soul (Jaffe/Boland) – Jack Harris & his Orchestra v. Dinah Miller – HMV BD5345
OEA6417-1 – The Snake Charmer (Powell/Whitcup) – Jack Harris & his Orchestra v. Dinah Miller – HMV BD5345

London 8 April 1938
OEA6289-1 – Mama, I Wanna Make Rhythm (Jerome/Byron/Kent) – Jack Harris & his Orchestra v. Dinah Miller – HMV BD5356

London 6 May 1938
OEA6460 -1 – Cry, Baby, Cry (Eaton/Shand) – Jack Harris & his Orchestra v. Dinah Miller – HMV BD5365

London 21 July 1938
OEA6373-1 – The Flat Foot Floogie (Gaillard/Stewart/Green) – Jack Harris & his Orchestra v. Dinah Miller – HMV BD5392
OEA6374-1 – I Can’t Face the Music (Koehler/Bloom) – Jack Harris & his Orchestra v. Dinah Miller – HMV BD5392

London 7 October 1938
DR2983-1 – Singers On Parade – (1) Love Walked In (George & Ira Gershwin) – Marjorie Stedeford vocal, (2) Time and Time Again (Strauss/Dale) – Jack Plant vocal, (3) It’s D’Lovely (Cole Porter) – Dinah Miller vocal – Accomp. by Felix Mendelssohn & his Orchestra – Decca F6832

London 5 March 1939
CA17441-1 – Talk To Me (‘Cause I Know What To Do) ((Hickey/Bird/Howard) – Reginald Williams & his Futurists v. Dinah Miller – Columbia FB2167

Stockholm 16 May 1940
5162-B – The Love Bug Will Bite You (Pinky Tomlin) – Diana Miller vocal, with Nisse Linds Hot Trio -– Sonora 3646/Sonora Swing 521
5163-C – Mama I Wanna Make Rhythm (Jerome/Byron/Kent) – Diana Miller vocal, with Nisse Linds Hot Trio – Sonora Swing 503
5164-C – You Made Me Love You (McCarthy/Monaco) – Diana Miller vocal, with Nisse Linds Hot Trio – Sonora Swing 503
5165-C – Lady Be Good/The Man I Love (George & Ira Gershwin) – Diana Miller vocal, with Nisse Linds Hot Trio -– Sonora 3646/Sonora Swing 521

Stockholm 18 September 1940
OSB1206-1 – Happy Little Song (Samson/Erbo) – Sam Samsons Orchestra v. Diana Miller – HMV X 6475
OSB1207-1 – Punchinello (Wright/Forrest) – Sam Samsons Orchestra v. Diana Miller – HMV X 6476
OSB1208-1 – Oh, Minnie (Samson/Erbo) – Sam Samsons Orchestra v. Diana Miller – HMV X 6475
OSB1209-1 – It’s a Blue World (Wright/Forrest) – Sam Samsons Orchestra v. Diana Miller – HMV X 6476

Stockholm 9 October 1940
5275-A – Hold Tight (Kent/Brandow/Robinson/Ware/Spotswood) – Diana Miller vocal with Charles Redlands Orchestra – Sonora Swing 525
5276-C – Begin the Beguine (Cole Porter) – Diana Miller vocal, with Charles Redlands Orchestra – Sonora Swing 513
5277–A/C – Night and Day (Cole Porter) – Diana Miller vocal, with Charles Redlands Orchestra – Sonora Swing 513/Tono SP 4107 & SSP 3033
5278-B – Don’t Worry ’bout Me (Koehler/Bloom) -– Diana Miller vocal, with Gosta Torners Orchestra – Sonora Swing 525

Stockholm 2 December 1940
1474-1 – Sleepy Time Gal (Alden/Egan/Lorenzo/Whiting) – Svenska Hotkvintetten v. Diana Miller – Columbia DS 1237
1475-1 – I’m Gonna Sit Right Down and Write Myself a Letter (Fats Waller) – Svenska Hotkvintetten v. Diana Miller – Columbia DS 1237

Stockholm 24 January 1941
5435-B – Sing, Sing, Sing (Louis Prima) – Diana Miller vocal, with Seymours Orchestra – Sonora Swing 524/Tono SP 4297 & SSP 3034
5436-C – My Heaven on Earth (Tobias/Pokrass/Baker) – Diana Miller vocal, with Seymours Orchestra – Sonora Swing 524/Tono SP 4297

Stockholm 27 January 1941
5441-A/C – Good Morning (Freed/Brown) – Diana Miller vocal, with Nisse Linds Hot Trio– Sonora Swing 523
5442-B – You’re Driving Me Crazy (Walter Donaldson) – Diana Miller vocal, with Nisse Linds Trio – Sonora 3743

Stockholm 28 January 1941
5444-C – An Apple for the Teacher (Burke/Monaco) – Diana Miller vocal, with Nisse Linds Hot Trio – Sonora 3743
5445-A/C – I Want My Mama ((Stillman/Jararaca/Paiva/Torre) – Diana Miller vocal, with Nisse Linds Hot Trio – Sonora Swing 523
Stockholm 12 May 1941
5591-C – Drummer Boy (Robert Edens) – Diana Miller vocal, with Seymours Orchestra – Sonora Swing 531
5592–C – Vem Bryr Sej Om Mej? (Nobody) (Edens/Roni) – Diana Miller vocal, with Seymours Orchestra – Sonora Swing 531

Stockholm 27 August 1941
5649-D – Rhum Boogie (Raye/Prince) – Diana Miller vocal, with Seymours Orchestra – Sonora 3579
5650-B – Hut Sut Song (Killion/McMichael/Owens) – Diana Miller vocal, with Seymours Orchestra – Sonora 3782
5651-D – Chica Chica Boom Chic (Gordon/Warren) – Diana Miller vocal, with Jay Elwings Orchestra – Sonora 3758
5652-C – I, Yi, Yi, Yi, Yi, I Like You Very Much (Gordon/Warren) – Diana Miller vocal, with Jay Elwings Orchestra – Sonora 3758
5653-C – Bobinga (d’Alverez-Carter/Larrson/Wilson) – Diana Miller vocal, with Jay Elwings Orchestra – Sonora 3759

Stockholm 16 April 1942
5936-B – Who (Hammerstein/Kern) – Diana Miller vocal, with Seymours Orchestra – Sonora Swing 552
5937-C – Love Letter (Diana Miller) – Diana Miller vocal, with Seymours Orchestra – Sonora Swing 552
5938-A – Chattanooga Choo Choo (Gordon/Warren) – Diana Miller vocal, with Seymours Orchestra – Sonora Swing 553/Tono SP 4136

Stockholm 2 May 1942
5963-D – Stormy Weather (Koehler/Arlen) – Diana Miller vocal, with Seymours Orchestra – Sonora Swing 553/Tono SP 4136 & SSP 3033

Stockholm 27 August 1942
6022-C – I Haven’t Got You (Redlands/Samson/Geddes) – Charlie Redlands Orchestra v. Jack Geddes & Diana Miller – Sonora Swing 582
6023-C – Don’t Sit Under the Apple Tree (Brown/Tobias/Stept) – Charles Redlands Orchestra v. Sven Arefeldt & Diana Miller – Sonora Swing 572/Tono SP 4193
6024-C – Corny Call (Redlands/Samson/Geddes) – Charles Redlands Orchestra v. Diana Miller – Sonora Swing 572/Tono SP 4193

Stockholm 3 September 1942
6040-F – Fascinating Rhythm (George & Ira Gershwin) – Diana Miller vocal, with Seymours Orchestra – Sonora Swing 564/Tono SP 4178
6041-C – You’ll Never Know (Gensler/Hanley) – Diana Miller vocal, with Seymours Orchestra – Sonora Swing 564/Tono SP 4178

Stockholm 2 April 1943
6196-E – Smoke Gets in Your Eyes (Harbach/Kern) – Nils Sodermans kvintetten v. Diana Miller – Sonora Swing 577/Tono SP 4251 & SSP 3034
6197-C/G – Jingle, Jangle, Jingle (Loesser/Lilley) – Nils Sodermans kvintetten v. Diana Miller – Sonora Swing 577/Tono SP 4251

Stockholm 14 July 1943
6278-C – I’ve Got a Gal in Kalamazoo (Gordon/Warren) – Diana Miller vocal, with Seymours Orchestra – Sonora Swing 584/Tono SSP 4299
6279-C – Watch the Birdie (Raye/DePaul) – Diana Miller vocal, with Seymours Orchestra – Sonora Swing 585/Tono SP 4298
6280-A/B – At Last (Gordon/Warren) – Diana Miller vocal, with Seymours Orchestra – Sonora Swing 584/Tono SSP 4299
6281-C – Boogie-Woogie Rhythm is Rocking the Town (Raye/DePaul/Penly) – Diana Miller vocal, with Seymours Orchestra – Sonora Swing 585/Tono SP 4298

Stockholm 8 November 1943
6373-B – You’d Be So Nice to Come Home To (Cole Porter) – Diana Miller vocal, with the Sweet Swingers – Sonora Swing 592/Tono SP 4306
6374-A – You’ll Never Know (Gordon/Warren) – Diana Miller vocal, with the Sweet Swingers – Sonora Swing 592/Tono SP 4306

Stockholm 15 February 1944
6440-A – Life’s Full of Consequences (Arlen) – Sam Samsons Orchestra v. Sven Arefeldt & Diana Miller – Sonora 7180/Sonora Swing 621
6441-B – Happiness is a Thing Called Joe (Harburg/Arlen) – Sam Samsons Orchestra v. Diana Miller – Sonora 7180/Sonora Swing 621

Stockholm 19 October 1944
6646-D – The Song in My Heart (Gunner Lunden-Welden) – Diana Miller vocal, with Lulle Ellbojs 16-manna Orchestra – Sonora Swing 636/Tono SP 4431
6647-B – It’s Love, Love, Love (David/Whitney/Kramer) – Diana Miller vocal, with Lulle Ellbojs 16-manna Orchestra – Sonora Swing 636/Tono SP 4431

Stockholm 31 March 1949
C1521-A – Os Quindins de Yaya (Angel/May/Care) – Diana Miller vocal, with Thore Ehrlings Orchestra – Cupol 4216
C1522-A – The Maharajah of Magador (Harris/Loeb) – Diana Miller vocal, with Thore Ehrlings Orchestra – Cupol 4216/Brunswick 82390

Stockholm 19 September 1952
OSB3686-2 – A Wonderful Guy (Rodgers & Hammerstein) – Diana Miller vocal, with Varitos Orchestra – HMV X 7829/AL 3251

Stockholm 22 September 1952
OSB3687-1 – I’m Gonna Wash That Man Right Outa My Hair (Rodgers & Hammerstein) – Diana Miller vocal, with Arne Domnerus Orchestra – HMV X 7829/AL 3251

Stockholm 1965
??? – Good Luck and God Bless You – Diana Miller Trio – Swedisc 1073
??? – Dreaming Eyes – Diana Miller Trio – Swedisc 1073

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